Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Anyone got an interest they would like to share?
Digger
Member
Member
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:28 am

#841 Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Digger » Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:59 pm

If you have ever fancied making a country stick now is a good time to start looking for one.
Now the leaves are coming off the trees and the sap is going down it is a good time to cut a stick of your choice.
Living where most of you do, Whaley Bridge or the surrounding area, you are ideally located to seek out a suitable shaft to have a go if you want to.

While I am not an expert and I have never carved a handle or shaped horn to make a handle I have turned out some reasonable sticks using only basic tools.
I will put a few tips on here to give you a basic insight into how to do it, the rest is up to you.
I must point out that all trees and bushes belong to someone so you should seek permission before you cut one. I’m sure you are capable of using your own discretion when you find one.
I would be wary of cutting a stick in parks or public places. Some eco warrior might report you if you do not have permission. I say this because a few years ago someone nailed a notice to a tree in a park to try and find a lost dog. Someone reported him and he was fined for damaging a tree!

In the picture, from top to bottom, the sticks are Wild Cherry. If you notice, the stubs of the branches are ¾” to 1” long. If you cut a stick it is always wise to leave the side-branches like this. If the side-branch cracks when it is seasoning in it can spoil the stick. It is easy to remove them when it has seasoned.
The next one down is the thumbstick made from Hazel, then Silver Birch and then Hazel again. The walking stick at the bottom is made from Gorse and the handle is made from Hawthorn.

The standard length for a walking stick is 3 foot, and a thumbstick is usually cut to the height of your shoulder. When it has seasoned it can be cut to a length that suits you.
.
Always cut a stick a few inches longer if you can so if it cracks at the ends when it is seasoning it will not spoil the finished stick.
Attachments
Sticks.JPG
Sticks.JPG (127.95 KiB) Viewed 2443 times



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#842 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Mon Nov 04, 2013 4:04 pm

He’s not a bad, old stick, Digger.



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#1185 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Sat Aug 23, 2014 2:32 pm

Where has Digger gone?

I took his advice on making a walking stick and carefully chose a piece of Sycamore that had fallen from the tree in my garden.
Here it is leaning up against my picnic table.


walking stick 1.jpg
walking stick 1.jpg (228.49 KiB) Viewed 2335 times




Well I stored it in the garage until it was dried out and cut and carved at it with my trusty bread knife until it was the correct length and shape and hey presto this is what it has turned out after all these months of hard work.

walking stick 2.jpg
walking stick 2.jpg (218.38 KiB) Viewed 2335 times

Thanks Digger.

R. S-S



User avatar
Norm
Site Worker
Site Worker
Posts: 627
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:03 am

#1186 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Norm » Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:30 pm

Plonker :lol:



Digger
Member
Member
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:28 am

#1292 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Digger » Thu Dec 25, 2014 9:14 pm

R. Stephenson-Smythe wrote:Where has Digger gone?

I took his advice on making a walking stick and carefully chose a piece of Sycamore that had fallen from the tree in my garden.
Here it is leaning up against my picnic table.



Image





Well I stored it in the garage until it was dried out and cut and carved at it with my trusty bread knife until it was the correct length and shape and hey presto this is what it has turned out after all these months of hard work.


Image


Thanks Digger.

R. S-S
You have made a good job of the stick R.S-S. Its amazing what lick of paint can do. :D



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2322 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:38 am

This part of the board seems to have been neglected since I made my own walking stick following Digger's accurate instructions but last night I was watching Spring Watch and thought I might show you something of interest; or rubbish as Norm calls it.

I moved into my house 14 years ago and as there are no street lamps or neighbours I put some sodium floodlights up around the house. I moved in in April and to be honest at that time I would have been hard put to see the difference between a robin or a blue-tit. But I have learned an awful lot over these years about the different types of birds that visit my house.

After about two months I noticed a very acrobatic little bird flying up and down to the lamp nearest the garage. I had no idea what it was but the postman is an avid bird watcher and he told me it was a pair of spotted flycatchers and they had come from Africa.

I watched the bird for the next few weeks and it had 4 eggs and they all hatched and flew away back to Africa.

The little bird has come back every year and it always, without fail, arrives between the 8th and 12th of May. This year it arrived on the 12th although the postman said he had seen it a day earlier than me.

How it knows the way back here from thousands of miles away is something I can not imagine.

Anyway here is a photo of the spotted fly catcher and his mate. The postman says there are only 3 pairs on his round.

And something even more astonishing I also have a couple of photos of a red footed falcon which is even rarer.

R. S-S
spotted fly catcher and red footed falcon 1.jpg
spotted fly catcher and red footed falcon 1.jpg (131.66 KiB) Viewed 2023 times



Digger
Member
Member
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:28 am

#2323 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Digger » Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:32 pm

Hello R. S-S,

They are good photographs. I have never heard of Red Footed Falcon so I looked it up. They breed as near as France and as far away as Russia, so it is,as you say, a rarity.
The Spotted Flycatchers coming from Africa is interesting.
I have a friend with a farm and every April Swallows nest in one of his outbuildings and have done for years. He opens the hay loft door so they can get to their nests and they return without fail. The come from Africa as well, how they find his farm year after year is amazing.
Attachments
Swallow.JPG
Swallow.JPG (282.59 KiB) Viewed 2016 times
Swallow nest.JPG
Swallow nest.JPG (312.76 KiB) Viewed 2016 times



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2325 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue Jun 28, 2016 11:18 am

Hi Digger,

The spotted fly-catchers (mum and dad) are both working hard bringing food to the little chicks which have now hatched.
They are amazingly acrobatic and I have yet to see them miss a fly.

R. S-S



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2326 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Wed Jun 29, 2016 10:36 am

Good morning Gail and Gnats,

I think I may have stumbled onto something that could just be coincidental; I have not seen any mention of it on the net or the newspapers.

I'll put the 'facts' on here later today or in the morning but I will certainly be looking forward to the matter being investigated for us by Chief Inspector Gritch using her inquisitive powers as our very own on site detective.

R. S-S



Digger
Member
Member
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 10:28 am

#2327 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Digger » Wed Jun 29, 2016 4:25 pm

R. Stephenson-Smythe wrote:Hi Digger,

The spotted fly-catchers (mum and dad) are both working hard bringing food to the little chicks which have now hatched.
They are amazingly acrobatic and I have yet to see them miss a fly.

R. S-S
Hi R.S-S,

Nice to know they are faring well. I hope they make it back to Africa.

A blackbird nested in a friends woodshed, but unfortunately it must have been found by magpies. One morning he saw broken shells on the floor and when he look the nest was empty.

A couple of years ago a Robin nested in a vent in the wall and today I noticed a Wren is building a nest in there.
Attachments
Blackbird nest.jpg
Blackbird nest.jpg (434.51 KiB) Viewed 1982 times
Robin nest 19-4-14.jpg
Robin nest 19-4-14.jpg (316.88 KiB) Viewed 1982 times



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2328 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Thu Jun 30, 2016 10:31 am

Hello Digger,

Shame about the nest been attacked by magpies. They are indeed a thorough nuisance.

As you know I live out in the wilds and there is a gamekeeper who looks after the area. You don't see magpies very often because he catches them in a Larsen trap and then dispatches them.

I have a wren's nest over my back door but it has not been used. I think the male wren builds several nests and shows them to a female bird who then chooses which one she likes best. It might be that the male wren has more than one partner.

One other thing about living out here is the fact that there no hedgehogs. The gamekeeper and several of the farmers blame the loss of these lovely creatures on to the badgers.
Apparently the badgers can force them open with its claws and then eat the hedgehog alive.
Ghastly but true.

R. S-S



gritch
Member
Member
Posts: 195
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 6:55 pm

#2329 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by gritch » Thu Jun 30, 2016 10:34 am

R. Stephenson-Smythe wrote:Good morning Gail and Gnats,

I think I may have stumbled onto something that could just be coincidental; I have not seen any mention of it on the net or the newspapers.

I'll put the 'facts' on here later today or in the morning but I will certainly be looking forward to the matter being investigated for us by Chief Inspector Gritch using her inquisitive powers as our very own on site detective.

R. S-S
Just read this......I am intrigued!


Gail

R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2330 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Thu Jun 30, 2016 10:56 am

Hi Gail,

I am just going out and haven't the time to put the mystery on here just now but I will be back later today.

I think even you might be hard put to solve this one.

R. S-S



User avatar
Gnatalee
Member
Member
Posts: 265
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 10:58 pm

#2331 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by Gnatalee » Thu Jun 30, 2016 12:01 pm

Gail - so am I !!

R.S-S tells us he is going to post his little mystery later yesterday, now it is to be later today - probably be a week on Monday at this rate :lol:

Gnats



R. Stephenson-Smythe
Advanced Member
Advanced Member
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:46 pm

#2332 Re: Have you ever fancied making a country stick?

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Thu Jun 30, 2016 1:59 pm

Thank you for that Gnats,

Well here goes:

It is a tale of airplane crashes. I used to be a frequent flier but after the very first flight I had to Majorca I spent the next two weeks worrying about the flight back to Manchester. I have had two emergency landings; one at Luton and the other at Salt Lake City. And I can tell you it is scary. I was working for a building company at Manchester Airport when the British Airtours flight caught fire on the runway. 55 dead and no where to put the bodies. In the end they laid them out on the concrete floor of the old Dan Air hangar. Things have changed a lot since then and there is now a huge mortuary at the airport.

Anyway the thing is this:

As far as I know all airlines use the same number for their individual flights and I don't know if this ever changes; for instance the Delta flight to Atlanta is always DL64 and the return is DL65. Similarly the Virgin flight to Orlando is VS074 and the return is VS075.

Now there was an EgyptAir crash on the 19th May this year which crashed into the Med and the flight number was 804. this number seemed to ring a bell somewhere inside my head so I tried a little bit of Gritch investigating and I was surprised what came up. Here are the results:

TWA Flight 800 crashed 17th July 1996 (230 dead)
Korean Flight 801 crashed 6th August 1997 (228 dead, 26 survivors)
British Eagle Flight 802 crashed 29th February 1964 (83 dead)
Korean Flight 803 crashed 27th July 1989 (75 dead another 4 dead on the ground 124 survivors)
EgyptAir Flight 804 crashed into the sea 19th May 2016 (all 66 dead)
PanAm Flight 806 crashed 30th January 1974 (97 dead)

Now just what is it about flights 800 plus? And why has Flight 805 been spared.

I don't know if the above is simply coincidental or not but surely our Chief Inspector can solve the mystery or perhaps I am barking up the wrong tree.

By the way EasyJet Flight 807 is from Gatwick to Edinburgh. I'd catch the bus if I was you.

Over to you Gail.

R. S-S



Post Reply Previous topicNext topic