More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

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#1301 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by rick » Mon Jan 12, 2015 9:11 am

Latest post of the previous page:

R.S.S. I always read your posts on the Goyt Valley with great interest.Your latest offering was special due to the fact you mention Thomas Braddock who was my great grandfather,you have provided me with a little more information on my family past.I look forward to your future posts on the Valley. Thank you Rick Braddock.



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#1307 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Fri Jan 16, 2015 10:59 am

Hello Rick,

I am pleased that you are enjoying the Errwood thread (there is much more of it if you click on the History Website at the bottom of the opening page).

As far as I knew your great grandfather, Thomas Braddock, was the estate's final gamekeeper and I had this confirmed to me only yesterday by another local gamekeeper.

However, just past the Cat and Fiddle pub on the way from Buxton to Macclesfield is a café. It was called the Moorland Café, now known as Peak View Tearooms, and a small article about it is on the internet:

It says that the café was first built in 1956 by Winifred Ivy and John Mason and the fireplace was built from stone from Errwood Hall obtained by John Mason ex footman and gamekeeper for the Hall.

I've not heard of John Mason at Errwood before and just how he became able to take stone from the Hall in 1956 is anybody's guess

R. S-S



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#1351 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue Feb 17, 2015 1:57 pm

High Peak Reporter

7 June 1930

Last Mass at Errwood Hall

The last of the Grimshaws, of Errwood Hall in the Goyt Valley, passed away recently and two reservoirs are to be constructed in the valley, one near Errwood. The Grimshaws were always a strong Roman Catholic family, and had their own private chapel at Errwood Hall. Before the Church of the Sacred Heart was erected at Whaley Bridge, Catholics in the village attended mass at Errwood Hall, and many of them have gone there on special occasions since. The chapel was a very beautiful one, the requisites for the altar being of solid gold and silver. The last mass was said in the chapel on Sunday morning by the Rev. Father O’Brien, of the Dominican Priory, Pendleton, who has been visiting Errwood Hall, and the Church at Whaley Bridge for twenty years. There was a large congregation, in which people employed on the estate and from Whaley Bridge were present. Much regret is expressed that the chapel should have to be given up for it was a charming place in which to worship. Some of the appointments have been taken to Oxford and others will go to the Dominican Priory at Pendleton, which for many years has been closely associated with Errwood Hall. There is to be a sale of the furniture, etc., at Errwood Hall on June 16th and many people will no doubt take advantage of the opportunity to see the hall as the Grimshaws knew it.



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#1358 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Mon Feb 23, 2015 2:17 pm

Macclesfield Courier

7 June 1930

Errwood Hall.

The onward march of civilisation is forever stealing some of the country’s most beautiful possessions. This cannot be more truly said than in respect of Errwood Hall, that magnificent building in the Goyt Valley, the contents of which are to be sold by Mr A.S. Turner, the week after next. A feature of the Hall grounds are the wonderful beds of azaleas and rhododendrons, which have been accounted the finest show of their kind in the world. I sincerely recommend all who can possibly visit the Hall on the two view days, Friday and Saturday next, to spare no effort in doing so. It might be the last opportunity of seeing such a magnificent show of blooms, for in all probability, if the Stockport Water Scheme matures they will be sacrificed. The sale which will be extended over five days, commences on Monday, June 16th, and there are very good pieces offered for sale.
In particular there are some fine old Masters which are expected to raise a high price.




Amazing how these Old Masters crop up so often in notable houses around Whaley Bridge.

R. S-S



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#1365 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Sun Mar 08, 2015 3:12 pm




High Peak News

14 June 1930

Some of the appointments of the private Roman Catholic Chapel at Errwood Hall, which is being sold upon June 16th, have gone to Oxford, and some to the Dominion Priory at Pendleton, which has always had a strong connection with Errwood. The chapel is very beautiful, the requisites for the altar being of solid gold and silver.



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#1370 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Wed Mar 18, 2015 11:15 am

Macclesfield Courier

29 August 1940

A SHRINE ON THE MOORS

little known edifice at errwood

A few weeks ago a reader of the “Courier” was rambling among the hills of Rainow and Saltersford, when he came across a shrine that was apparently being allowed to go into a state of disrepute.
The reader asked if we could give further information, and Councillor Walter Smith, the local historian, has kindly supplied the following information :--
st joseph’s shrine, Taxal, about a mile N.W. of Errwood Hall, stands in a small coppice hidden from view under Foxlow Edge on the old Errwood Estate ; it faces Withinleach Moor, Pymchair Plantation and Cats Tor. About 1330 feet in Altitude, it is the highest above sea level of all the places set apart for prayer and meditation in the neighbourhood of Macclesfield. St. Stephen’s Church, or Forest Chapel, is 1282 feet (and not 1400 as stated year after year on the Rushbearing advertisement sheets.) Jenkin Chapel is 1089 feet, and Ludchurch a little above the 1000 feet line.
The shrine is a small round stone structure about seven feet diameter within, and the perpendicular walls are about the same (average) height. A sloping gray stone roof comes to a point surmounted by a cross. Within, the shrine has bare mortared walls and a good open-timbered roof which has been renewed at some time. Two slits in the walls about two inches wide on the outside, but widely splayed in the thick walls, admit light to the interior.
The furniture of the shrine consists of an altar, a praying-stool, and a tiny but beautiful marble piscina fixed to the right hand wall. The frame of the praying-stool is of undressed logs from the woods, with thin billets of wood to kneel upon.
A beautiful coloured picture in tiles on the wall above the altar acts as a reredos. The subject is St. Joseph carrying the child Jesus in his arms ; the heads of both are adorned with halos, but that of Jesus is distinguished, being a halo radiant. What may be the name of the Spanish artist who designed the picture appears at the bottom :--
Fa. Valldecabres Valencia (Espana), and F. and P. Bou (as near as I can decipher it) down in the right-hand corner may be the maker(s) of the tile.
High up above the picture a marble tablet is set in the wall on which is inscribed in letters of gold :--

nunca se le invoca envano
a se jose
prueba de gratitud
1889 D de y.
The words may be translated : No one ever prays to St. Joseph in vain : a token of gratitude :-- and the initials are doubtless those of the donator of the shrine.
Of special interest is the altar which is of white marble fixed and made fast in the wall ; similar to that at Forest Chapel.
In the Roman Church, and in the English Church, the altar is indispensable. For the first four or five centuries of English Church history the altar was of wood and was called Godes borde, i.e. God’s board or table. In 1076 Lanfrance and the papal legates ordered that altars be of stone, with the result that the wooden altars were removed and stone altars setup. At the Reformation these stone altars were thrown down and Ecclesiastical Courts have ruled that altars be made of wood and movable. But Ecclesiastical Courts do not rule over our shrine on the moors, nor, seemingly, over the chapel in the forest.
The Grimshaw family, who were devout and faithful Catholics, formerly owned and lived at Errwood Hall and had their own private chapel there. The Stockport Corporation acquired the hall and estate some years ago for the water of the Goyt Valley, and the Grimshaws left this part of the country, but I understand the shrine remains vested in the present day representative of the family who pays to it periodical visits.
In spite of the family being non-resident I have found that for several years, whenever I have visited the shrine, there have always been one or two vases of flowers on the altar ; showing that the place still lives in the hearts of some devotees. When last I was there, a postcard was attached to the flowers, on which was written :--

We have been
We have wondered
We have been won

to which two signatures were appended. The message is somewhat cryptic but there is no mistaking the reverent and pious spirit of the writers. The shrine itself is a symbol of the religious spirit it engenders, and I, for one, should be grieved if any harm befell it. “There are many voices in the world, and not one of them without significance.”




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#1407 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Wed Apr 29, 2015 9:46 am

High Peak News

3 April 1943

A rumour which has circulated in Whaley Bridge recently that the vault at Errwood Hall, in which members of the well known Grimshaw family are buried, had been broken into by vandals, was denied this week by Mr Oyarzibel, of the Stockport Corporation Waterworks, who is in charge of the Goyt Reservoir estate on which Errwood Hall stands.
“I wish to state quite emphatically,” he told a “High Peak News” reporter, “that the vault is undisturbed, and unlikely to be entered either by vandalistic hikers or by over-enterprising schoolboys. The vault was bricked up and sealed, at the request of the Grimshaws, and it would be impossible to penetrate it in any way without a great deal of demolition work being done. This would be out of the question, as a member of the waterworks staff patrols the area continually.”
The rumour arose, apparently, because a group of local people who were in the vicinity of the Hall recently noticed that the porch above the vault had had its roof broken in, making a hole, in the words of one of them, “big enough to put a bullock through.” This, it was assumed, opened directly to the vault.
In actual fact the mortuary chapel is situated between the chapel proper and the vault, and between the mortuary chapel and the vault is the stone and cement floor of the chapel, built over a concrete floor, which stands over the oak-raftered ceiling of the vault.
Mr Oyarzibel took the opportunity of denying the stories that the bodies of the Grimshaws in the vault are embalmed in glass-topped coffins, and that the corpses still wear the gold watch chains, and so forth, which they wore when they were alive. The bodies, he says, are not embalmed, but are buried in coffins of shell, lead and oak. And the coffins contain no valuables.
He is in a position to know, for as the last remaining member of the Grimshaw household he saw the coffins laid in the vault and himself helped to seal the vault when the Goyt Valley was acquired by the Stockport Corporation for flooding.
Nevertheless, there has for some time been evidence of unnecessary vandalism and interference at the Hall on the part of hikers and schoolboys. The chapel has been entered, and many windows of the hall have been broken. The graveyard round the chapel, where members of the household were buried, has been trampled on and crosses over the graves have been overturned. The railings round the graveyard have been pulled down.
It is likely that in the near future Stockport Corporation may make new arrangements for preventing this kind of thing from going on.
The Hall, where for nearly 100 years the Grimshaw family lived, wielding an enormously beneficent influence in Whaley Bridge, will eventually be demolished. Some of the stonework of one wing was used to build the two houses on the estate now occupied by members of the waterworks staff, and window sills and frames were removed for the same purpose. A great deal of timber has also been removed. The lead from the roofs was removed some time ago to be used for other purposes, with the result that the rain has penetrated, and done damage to the interior of the Hall. Eventually it will be completely demolished, and the materials used for a variety of purposes, though the site on which it stands will never be flooded.



Norm,

That is the final article I have on the Hall.

Perhaps you can add these to the history site.

I do, however, have a lot more information regarding the residents and so on which I will continue to write on here.

R. S-S



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#1443 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue May 19, 2015 1:38 pm

Hi Norm,

As our work on the mystical, and for some elusive, ancient stone is now 50% complete.

It gives me a little more time to add more information on the inhabitants of Errwood Hall.

So this section will be the obituaries of those fine people:



Manchester Guardian 29th June 1850

Died: On the 21st inst., at Leamington, Anne, wife of Samuel Grimshawe, Esq., of Errwood Hall, Cheshire.

Stockport Advertiser 28th June 1850

Died: On the 21st inst., at Leamington, Anne, wife of Samuel Grimshawe, Esq., of Errwood Hall, near Buxton.


Manchester Guardian 1st February 1851

Died: On the 27th ult., at his residence, Errwood Hall, Cheshire, in the 81st year of his age, Samuel Grimshawe Esq.


Stockport Advertiser 31st January 1851

Died: On the 27th inst., at his residence, Errwood Hall, Cheshire, Samuel Grimshawe, Esq., in the 81st year of his age.


Manchester Courier 1st February 1851

Deaths : On the 27th ult, at his residence, Errwood Hall, Cheshire, Samuel Grimshaw, Esq., in the 81st year of his age.


Macclesfield Courier 1st February 1851

Deaths : On the 27th ult., at his residence, Erwood Hall, Cheshire, Samuel Grimshawe, Esq., in the 81st year of his age.







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#1493 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue Jun 02, 2015 11:02 am

The Tablet

28 April 1883

Deaths : Grimshawe --- Died on Friday, April 20, Samuel Mary Dominic Grimshawe, Tertiary of the Order of St. Dominic, of Errwood Hall, near Buxton, having received the Holy Father’s blessing, and being fortified with the last Sacraments. Sweet Jesus have mercy on him.

Obituary

We deeply regret to announce the death of mr grimshawe, of Errwood Hall, Derbyshire, which occurred on the 20th inst. Of the deceased gentlemen a correspondent writes :-- “One more has gone to his reward, of that noble band, confessors of the faith, who now more than forty years ago came out from Oxford to help manfully in renewing the old spirit of the Catholic faith in England, which the penal laws had done their best to trample out. Prompt, like the apostles of old, to the call of their Divine Master, in how many cases did they not leave literally all things to follow Him. One by one they are called away, but thank God the Peter and Paul of that apostolic College are still in our midst, well nigh bowed down by the labours of their lives, but yet endowed with that power which leads men to god. Samuel Grimshawe, of Errwood Hall, died on Friday last, after a long and painful illness, which prepared him for his death. He was born in Manchester in the August of 1808 and was sent to school to a Protestant clergyman of Alderley , in Cheshire. He often spoke in affectionate remembrance of his school days. He entered as an under-graduate at Brazenoze about the year 1826, and later took his degrees of B.A. and M.A. in the same College. He therefore benefited by the influence of John Henry Newman, who was still in residence at Oriel. It was not, however, for some time after he left Oxford that he entered the Catholic Church—not indeed before the year 1851 ; but the seed had been sown, and needed but the gentle influence of that spirit which breatheth where it will to germinate, to grow, and to bear fruit. To some of those good men it has been given to do a great work for God, and one which is evident and striking to the minds of all. But for the most part their work has been to show how powerful is the grace of God for good, to illustrate in their lives the close union of God with His creatures, shown by the way in which they have walked without reproof before Him. From the time of his being received into the Church, Mr Grimshawe's prominent wish was to be serviceable in religion in every way in his power. He had not long to wait before he had an opportunity of showing his zealous devotion. Those who are old enough to remember the outburst of anti-christian feeling throughout the country which called the re-establishment of the Catholic hierarchy in the land a Papal aggression will remember the then celebrated Stockport riots. The mob, urged on by those who were afraid to take any prominent part themselves, attacked the houses of the Catholics in Stockport, and finally the Catholic church, which they set fire to and completely wrecked. The venerable priest is still living who was able, only at the peril of his life to preserve the Blessed Sacrament from desecration. A terrible riot followed, which was quelled only by the interference of the military. As a magistrate it was Mr Grimshawe's duty to act at Stockport, and his labour at the time was to defend the poor Catholics, who were accused of beginning this riot, and to see justice done to them. We all know how he succeeded in his efforts. It was ever the prayer of his life that he might not in this world receive the reward of any good work that he might do. Immediately after his reception into the Church he opened a mission on his estate, and ever after bore the entire expense of its maintanance, and, in addition, he founded and helped to suppoirt the mission at Levenshulme, near Manchester. He had the most filial devotion to the Head of the Church, and none but the Almighty God and himself know how far he strained every effort to contribute most generously towards the help which was raised for the late Holy Father in his troubles. His constant thought was to hide from his left hand the good which his right had done. His acts of hidden generosity will not be known until that time when the secrets of all hearts shall be revealed. From his naturally delicate state of health he was of a very retiring disposition, so that he was intimately known only to those who had close intercourse with him, but the few who knew him well, admired and loved him. A similar modesty caused him to hide his great erudition which would have made him shine in any position he could have chosen. It was only the occasional flash of learning drawn from him suddenly and unawares which revealed the powers of mind and strength of intellect which he possessed. He was the humblest of the humble. One of his oldest friends has described him as "a true man," and these simple words best reveal his character. He was true to his God when he broke through every tie to obey His call ; he was true to himself in the simple and unaffected life he led in the midst of his family. He was true to his friends in his unswerving fidelity, and and to his dependents in his gentle and considerate thoughtfulness for their wants. He has gone from us, but is still with us, for we have loved him in life, and we shall not forget him in death. R.I.P.”



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#1597 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Mon Jul 20, 2015 10:28 am

Buxton Advertiser

Saturday May 5th 1883

FUNERAL OF S. GRIMSHAWE ESQ.

On Tuesday last the remains of that esteemed and honoured friend of the poor, Samuel Grimshawe Esq., Errwood Hall, near Buxton, were conveyed to their last resting place. The morning was beautifully fine, and the air being dry and bracing , and the sun at intervals shining pleasantly, made Errwood - nestling as it does at the base of the Cheshire slopes, the sides of which are pleasantly studded with plantings of great beauty and artistic location - appear what it really is - omitting of course the present grief, a happy English home. The funeral was fixed for eleven o'clock, but it was not until fully half-past twelve that the procession was formed. Solemn requiem mass was sung in the Entrance Hall, a temporary altar being erected for the occasion by the Rev. Father Macauliffe, assisted by several clergymen, and in the presence of the Bishops of Salford and Shrewsbury, their attendants being the Revs Canon Allan and Walker, and Monsgrs Cressdell V.G., and Kershaw V.G. The music selected, which was admirably rendered by the Roman Catholic choir from St. Joseph's, Stockport, under the able conductorship of Father Robinson, was that specially composed for the funeral of the late Bishop of Shrewsbury. The sermon was preached by the Right Rev. Dr Knight, Bishop of Shrewsbury, who took his text from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Thessalonians, at the close of which he paid a well-merited tribute to the memory of the deceased gentleman, enumerating the leading incidents in his religious career. The coffin, which was placed in the Entrance Hall, was strewn with flowers of the choicest and most suitable description, the beauty of which was enhanced by twelve artificial lights, with which it was surrounded. It was of polished oak, elaborately mounted in brass, with panelled sides and gilded mountings and bore the following inscription:-

Jesus mercy, Mary help.
Samuel Mary Dominic Grimshawe
Tertiary of the Order of St. Dominic
Born 5th August 1808
Died 20th April 1883
St. Joseph pray for him
R. I. P
Coat of Arms - "Tarde sed tute."

At the close of the sermon a procession was formed, the choir leading and chanting the funeral service, which was read by the Bishop of Shrewsbury (the Right Rev. Dr Knight, with whom was the Bishop of Salford (Right. Rev. Dr Vaughan.) The following clergymen attended and took part in the proceedings:- Very Rev. Canon Sheenan, V.G., Manchester; Very Revs Canons Frith, Walker, Allan, Callagher; Monsgrs Cressdell, V.G. , and Kershaw, V.G; Fathers Robinson, Allixis, Willibrood, Lawless, Allen, Butler (Friar Monastery, Haverstock Hill), Bell, Browne. Singleton, Maurice, Stanton and Power, with two sisters from Bon Secours Convent, followed by the chief mourners:- the widow of the deceased, leaning on her brother, Colonel Allan, the Misses Grimshawe, Miss Gaskell, Miss Munster, Mr Killminster, Capt and Mrs Butler, Mr J.P. Munster, Dr Darwin, The Fern, Buxton; Dr C. Bennett, Dr Robertson, Rev G. Robertson, Mrs Bennett, Mrs Carter, Mr and Mrs Sawyer, Mr Rickett, Mr J. Downes, Mr Thompson, Miss Murphy, and others, followed by the tenantry and crowds of inhabitants from the neighbouring villages, who came to pay their last tribute of respect to their deceased friend and benefactor. As the procession marched slowly and mournfully round the terrace to the top of Chronicle Hill on the summit of which beautiful mound is the family tomb - the dimmed eyes and uncovered heads bespoke the love and veneration in which the deceased was held. When the coffin, which was borne on the shoulders of eight stalwart men - the bearers in all numbering twenty four - was placed in the vault, several massive and beautiful wreaths were placed up on it.
The splendour of the vestments, worn by the bishops and clergymen, added immensely to the beauty of the cortege.
Mr Fynas, of Great Ancoats, Manchester, was the undertaker, and his arrangements were excellent.
The following biographical sketch has been supplied to us by the deceased gentleman's chaplain:-
Samuel Grimshawe, of Errwood Hall, died on Friday, April 20th, after a long and painful illness, which prepared him for his death. He was born in Manchester, on the 5th of August, 1808, and was sent to a Protestant clergyman at Alderley, Cheshire. He often spoke in affectionate remembrance of his school days. He entered as a graduate at Brazenose about the year 1826; and later on took his degrees of B.A. and M.A. in the same college. He then, through the influence of John Henry Newman, who was still in residence at Oriel, went over to the Roman Catholic Church; but it was not, however, for sometime after he had left Oxford - not, indeed, before the year 1851; but the seed had been sown, and it needed but the gentle influence of the spirit, which breathed so much will to generate, to glow, and to bear fruit. To some of those good men it has been given to do a great work for God, and one which is evident and striking to the minds of all; but for the most part their work has been to show how powerful is the grace of God for good and to illustrate in their lives the close union of God with his creatures, shown by the way in which they have walked before God without reproof. From the time of his being received into the Catholic Church, Mr Grimshawe's prominent wish was to be serviceable in religion in every way in his power. As a county magistrate he was most diligent, and he had not long to wait before he had an opportunity of showing his zealous devotion. Those who are old enough to remember the outburst of anti-christian feeling which was called the re-establishment of the Catholic Hierarchy in the land a Papal aggression , will remember the celebrated Stockport riots. The mob, urged on by those who were afraid to take any prominent part themselves, attacked the houses of the Catholics in Stockport, and finally the Catholic Church, which they set fire to and completely wrecked. The venerable priest is still living who was able, only at the peril of his life to preserve the blessed sacrament from deterioration. The muscle of English Christianity, the Irishman, would not stand by unconcerned, and see his Church destroyed, and a terrible riot followed, which was quelled only by the interference of the military. As a magistrate it was Mr Grimshawe's duty to act at Stockport, and his labour at the time was to defend the poor Catholics, who were accused of beginning this riot, and to see justice done to them. We all know how he succeeded in his efforts. It was the prayer of his life that he might not in this world receive the reward of any good work that he might do. Immediately after his reception into the Church he opened a mission. He did not think in doing this there was anything more than he was called upon to do, but those who knew him intimately thought far otherwise. He had the most filial devotion to the work of his Church, and, none but the Almighty and himself knew how far he strained every effort, to contribute most generously towards the help which was raised for the late Holy Father in his troubles. It may not have been quite forgotten how it was his daughters, who, imitating the retiring modesty of their father, put forward a name of eminence, while witholding their own names, organised and carried through that noble collection of the children of England to the late Pope of more than six thousand pounds. His constant effort was to hide from his left hand the good which his right hand did. His acts of hidden generosity will not be known until the time when the secret of all hearts shall be revealed. From his naturally delicate state of health, he was of a very retiring disposition, so that he was intimately known only by those who had close intercourse with his; but the few who knew him well, admired and loved him. He has been described by one of those intimate friends as "a true man", and those simple words truly describe his character. He was true to his God; he was true to himself in the simple and unaffected life he led in the midst of his family; he was true to his friends and his dependants, in his unvarying fidelity, and in his gentle and considerate thoughtfulness for those who asked for help. To his dependants he endeared himself by his kindly manner and gentle disposition, and on his estate he was looked upon more as a father than a master. The high affection in which he was held was testified by the tears which were shed by all around him. He occupied the position of magistrate decorum at Buxton for many years.







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#1630 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Fri Jul 31, 2015 10:46 am

Manchester Guardian

May 2nd 1883

The Late Mr S. Grimshawe

The funeral of Mr S. Grimshawe, of Errwood Hall, near Whaley Bridge, who died on the 20th ult., took place yesterday. The deceased gentleman was born in Manchester in August 1808. At the age of 18 he entered Brasenose College, Oxford, where he was in company for some time with John Henry Newman, now Cardinal Newman. He took the degrees of B.A. and M.A.. and in 1851 was received into the Roman Catholic Church. At the funeral there was a large congregation of Catholic clergy and friends, including the Bishop of Salford, the Bishop of Shrewsbury, Mgr. Provost Croskell, V.G., Mgr. Canon Kershaw, Very Rev. Canon Sheenan, V.G. and others. the Bishop of Shrewsbury delivered the funeral oration in the chapel, and the coffin was afterwards removed to the mausoleum at the top of Chronicle Hill, within the grounds, the clergy, Mrs Grimshawe, the Misses Grimshawe , and other mourners following. After prayers the procession returned to the hall. The funeral arrangements were entrusted to Mr Fyans, of this city.



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#3011 Re: More about Errwood Hall and the Grimshaws

Post by drstir » Thu May 02, 2019 5:59 pm

Thanks for posting these fascinating snippets, R. S-S.

I've just put one of them on my website here: https://goyt-valley.org.uk/grimshawe-vault-sealed/.

I hope that's ok...



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