Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

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chulme
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#2975 Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by chulme » Sun Apr 07, 2019 6:22 pm

In 1903, a three-year-old boy, George Edward Drury, son of Francis Drury, fell into the canal at Whaley and drowned. His address is given as 'Naylors Cottages.' Does anyone know how that relates to the present buildings? It was in the Cheshire part of Whaley near or on Canal Street - also puzzling, from the 1861 census (spelling mossibly different) are 'Handford's Row' and 'Buckley's Row.' Is there any sort of map record to match these names to buildings which may still exist? I recall nothing about them from my days in Canal Street.

Thanks for any help -

Charlie Hulme



R. Stephenson-Smythe
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#2976 Re: Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue Apr 09, 2019 12:26 pm

Good afternoon Charlie,

This is a difficult one you pose but I’ll have a go. I may be right or maybe wrong but probably somewhere in the middle.

I can’t help you with the little boy who drowned in the canal though.

But with regards to street names all I can say is this:

As you know from the 1861 census loads of streets and avenues have had name changes some relatively recent such as the houses on Long Hill nicknamed ‘Flanders’.

The Navigation pub was once known as the Vaux Inn or Vaux Tavern and the row of houses down the side was known as Vaux Row.
Later the Vaux Inn became The Navigation and Vaux Row became Johnson Street. If you look again at the census you will see at that time the beer-house keeper of the Navigation was called Ann Johnson so maybe Johnson Street was named after her; who knows?

You can generally follow where the streets were as they were obviously placed in order so Buckley’s Row and Handford Row would be somewhere close by.

There were only 4 houses on Buckley’s Row so were they on the opposite side of Johnson Street? Is there still a row of 4 stone cottages somewhere down there?
Again if you remember the piece of land down the road from The Jodrell Arms where the huge bill board used to be was a row of 4 houses known as Salt Box Row. Perhaps that was formerly Buckley’s Row. It is now known as The Salt Box.
It looks like Handford Row consisted of just 2 houses; maybe a pair of stone semis.

However next on the list is The Jodrell Arms and just down from the Jodrell there are indeed a pair of stone semis. Local cricketer Darren Crompton lives in one.

You would need to go and look around.

Anyway, for what it is worth, that is my best bet.

R. S-S



chulme
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#2977 Re: Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by chulme » Tue Apr 09, 2019 4:52 pm

Thanks R. S-S for the interesting reply, which has inspired me to further work.

I feel you are correct about Buckley's Row and Handford Row in 1861. The name 'Salt Box Row' seemed like a very old name which put me off, but it seems it was just a local nickname. Am I right in thinking they were rendered, or painted, white - hence the name? They had gone by the time I lived in Canal Street in the 50s. The 1881 census has six houses listed just as 'Whaley' and Charles Bottoms is common to 1861 and 1881, which matches.

Interesting that Darren Crompton, cricketer, lives on one of the semis: In my day it was his ancestor (great grandfather?) Stanley who ran a haulage business based in the canal transhipment shed with two dark blue Thames Trader lorries driven by his son Barry Crompton and Joe Hulme (no relation). Next door was the home of Mr Lee who looked after the horses that pulled the wagons on the canal wharf railway branch.

There is some confusion over time about those semi-detached houses, latterly they were 41/43 Market Street but earlier were numbered 23/25 Buxton Road, or Bridgemont Road. These must be Handford Row. On further investigation using the 1911 census, the next four houses, 27, 29, 31 and 33 must be 'Salt Pot Row' a.k.a. Buckley's Row. The 1911 census taker's summary uses the name Naylor's Cottages for all six.

No.33 must have been small: Ann Lomas, widow, age 72, stocking knitter and repairer, gives the number of rooms as two (4 would be a typical cottage).

Vaux Row was both sides of Johnson Street, I think. I recall that our deeds for 11 Canal Street mention a Vaux, and John Egerton Killer as owners of the area.

As for falling in the canal - been there, done that! Fortunately it wasn't very deep by that time.

Charlie



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#2978 Re: Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Tue Apr 09, 2019 5:12 pm

Hi Charlie,

No time this evening but I will reply tomorrow afternoon.
But just to say Salt Box Cottages was most certainly the correct name. There were 2 wells at the back and the traveling circus used to call there so the elephants could have a drink.
I'll let you know where the wells ran to tomorrow.
I too have fell into the canal on more than one occasion.
Not pleasant.

We obviously know the same people: Stan and Barry, grand folk. You will know the late Alan Shaw who will make an appearance in this saga.

R. S-S



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#2982 Re: Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by R. Stephenson-Smythe » Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:39 pm

Good afternoon Charlie,

Sorry I’m late getting back to you, I’ve had a few problems over the past 2 days.

Stan Crompton was Darren’s grandfather and Darren’s dad was Barry. All nice men.

Back to Salt Box Cottages: I have no idea when they were demolished or when the bill board was put up. The site is now known as The Salt Box. I think it was bought for about £10,000.00 without planning and later the owner did get planning and sold it for over £50,000.00.

So the 2 wells served Salt Box Cottages with water.

Anyway Alan Shaw phoned me one day and asked me to go down to see him. He had a store room under his office and under Pear Tree Cafe just opposite the Navigation pub.
Bits of the wooden floor were rotten so he had decided to replace the whole floor. He had pulled the floor up by the time I got there and underneath was a beautiful stone built chamber. Whoever had built it was certainly a top quality tradesman. The chamber was full of crystal clear water.
I measured it up for him and converted it to gallons. From memory I think it held about 300 gallons or 2,400 pints. Anyway it was a hell of a lot.
We got a pump and pumped it out until it was dry and Alan said he would start putting a new floor in the next morning.
The following morning he phoned me again and asked me to nip down. The chamber was once again full of crystal clear water.
I told him he could be sat on a fortune in bottled water sales. Now I can’t remember how or why we found out but we decided the water was coming from the wells at the rear of Salt Box Cottages.
Alan thought that whoever owned that land would realise what was going on and would block the water supply and bottle it and sell it for themselves so he didn’t have it tested and boarded the floor up.

End of story.

R. S-S



chulme
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#2987 Re: Naylor's Cottages and other lost names

Post by chulme » Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:53 pm

Thanks for this.

We lived at No.11 Canal Street, and I knew something about the water supply in the cellar, although I never got to go down there - I guess it would have been used when our back yard was roofed over and operated as a mineral water factory.

Roy Drinkwater, and later Alan Shaw, collected our £2 per year ground rent to be sent with theirs to agents of the Jodrell Estates, until it was forgotten about.

I can find the semis at 23-25 Market Street on the 1939 Register, both occupied by Lee family members, but nothing that could be Salt Box Cottages, so I reckon they were demolished even before then as unfit for habitation. They can be seen in picture no 43 of the book 'Whaley Bridge in old picture postcards' by Robert and Pamela Pierce.

Charlie



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