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Dr Allan

The following stories are from local newspapers. Not sure why he is called Allen and not Allan, also any spelling mistakes have not been corrected.

April 1881  An inquest was held at the Joddrell Arms into the death of a child whose decomposed body was found in Toddbrook Reservoir. Dr Allen had made the postmortem examination and found that the baby had lived a day or two. He was unable to say whether the child had suffocated or died from neglect.  There was a bruise to the head but  this had not caused death. The body 20 inches in length had been placed in a biscuit tin measuring only 9.5inches by 8.5 inches. The police were trying to detect the perpetrator, guilty of either murder or neglect

November 1886  A skeleton was discovered by workers at Taxal Edge Stone Quarry. The skull and bones were now in the posession of Dr Allen who had established that they had been there for at least 100 years.

November 1886 Mrs Pennington was pitched from her trap when the horse bolted and was very badly hurt.  She was taken to the residence of Dr Allen where she now lay.

June 1887  Charles Bagshaw was badly injured in an accident at the Buxton Lime Company's colliery. A hand was smashed, his head was badly cut and an ear nearly severed. Dr Allen ordered his immediate removal to Stockport Infirmary where he lies in a critical condition.

August 1887  Edmund Kirk, a grocers assistant admitted savagely assaulting a little boy Hoprace Wooley. On the 29th the Wooley family, one of whom was a member of the Salvation Army, in their turn attacked Kirk. He was knocked down and kicked, had two teeth knocked out, both eyes made up and his whiskers pulled out. He lost a deal of blood and later Dr Allen had to attend to him.

February 1888  A mysterious death.  George Sawyer of New Mills left home on Tuesday to go in search of work. He was seen just before midnight on Thursday at Horwich End and was drunk. At 2 am he was heard in a brook and some time later found unconscious in a yard behind The Navigation. He was lying in a pool of blood and had severe wounds to his head, elbow and knee.  Dr Allen dressed his wound but alas, he died on Sunday.

October 1889  An explosion at Hall Brother's bleachworks fatally injured a youth, George Goddard.  He was assisting in removing the top of a boiler filled with boiling pulp when the vessel expolded. He was hurled some distance and was severely scalded and burned. Dr Allen attended to him at home but he died early next day.

November 1889  Dr Allen was walking towards Stoneheads at 8.30pm to visit a patient. It was a dark night and he carried a lantern. Whilst walking along a path across a field a gun shot rang out about 20 yards away.  Thinking of poachers he walked on only to hear another shot. From the flash he calculated that it was fired at him. A third shot struck the wall at his side. Alarmed, he retraced his steps are returned to safety. It was assumed that he was mistaked for the constable who had recently had several local people before the magistrates

March 1892  Dr Allen was appointed Medical Officer Of Health for Whaley Bridge at a salary of £20 per annum. At the same time John Kirk was appointed Inspector Of Nuisances

August 1892 The annual horse show was held at Buxton.  The grandstand which seated 700 people collapsed without warning apart from mometary creaking. The occupants were pitched backwards amidst a mass of planking. The injured were conveyed to The Devonshire Hospital. The most seerious injury was to Dr Allen who sustained broken legs.

November 1892 Two boys, one 12 years old fought during their breakfast break at Botany Bleach Works where they were employed. One of the boys suffered knife wounds and was attended to by Dr Allen who said that the injury would have been fatal if a little higher.

March 1893 Dr Allen is caring for two men named Phillipson and Ether injured in an explosion at the Gunpowder Works.

May 1895 At a property auction at The Railway Hotel, Dr Allen purchased two semi detatched villas and a cottage at Horwich End for £590.

June 1896  Edith Proctor the 12 year old daughter of blacksmith Thomas Proctor died suddenly after becoming paralysed.  It was thought to be caused by sunstroke but Dr Allen who gave no hope of recovery certified death from convulsions.

March 1898  Two joiners were seriously hurt when part of the Joddrell Arms collapsed.  The front portion was being rebuit and enlarged and was supported by girders and pillars. A number of men were buried under a mass of stone and iron. Dr Allen attended to the injured.

December 1898 John Cotton was sentanced to death for the murder of his wife aboard a canal boat moored at Bugsworth. Mrs Cotton had been severely beaten about the head with a poker.  When Dr Allen examined her she was unconscious and suffering from a number of wounds, was concussed and had a clot of blood on the brain and a fracture to the skull. He considered the case to be hopeless and she died that afternoon.

High Peak News


3 March 1888


WHALEY BRIDGE

Sudden death of a woman, strange conduct of a doctor


On Thursday afternoon Mr. R.G. Megginson, deputy-coroner, held an inquest at the Shepherd’s Arms Inn, Whaley Bridge, touching the death of Anne Jane Jodrell, aged 27 years, wife of Jonathan Jodrell, labourer, Horwich End, who died on Wednesday during confinement.

The Coroner said they had met to inquire into the cause of the death of Ann Jane Jodrell, who for some time past had been expecting her confinement, and for that reason she had secured the services of a midwife living in the neighbourhood.


Nature took its course sooner than was expected, and the midwife had not arrived, so they were obliged to run for a medical man.


They went to Dr Allan, and they succeeded in awakening him. He came either to the door or the window, and, being told the circumstances of the case and what was required, said: “Have you got a sovereign?”


The poor man (the husband) replied that he had not, and the doctor said: “I refuse to attend.” He did not attend, and the woman died.


They would hear the evidence as to these facts which he had opened to them and which he believed to be true.




A Sudden Death of a Woman

First Witness was Jonathan Jodrell, husband of the deceased.

First Witness was Jonathan Jodrell, husband of the deceased.

Second Witness was Edna Holmes, a charwoman.

Second Witness was Edna Holmes, a charwoman.

The summing-up by The Coroner

The summing-up by The Coroner

A Letter to the High Peak News by A. Vicar, 10th March 1888

A Letter to the High Peak News by A. Vicar, 10th March 1888

A Letter by Dr Allan, 7th March 1888

A Letter by Dr Allan, 7th March 1888

A Letter by Jonathan Jodrell, 12th March 1888

A Letter by Jonathan Jodrell, 12th March 1888

A Letter by A.H.Colles, 13th March 1888

A Letter by A.H.Colles, 13th March 1888

A Neighbour of Dr Allan sent a Letter in support of him

A Neighbour of Dr Allan sent a Letter in support of him

A Second Letter by A. Vicar, 19th March 1888

A Second Letter by A. Vicar, 19th March 1888

Below are  newspaper articles and letters regarding the death of Anne Jane Jodrell.

Two more letters from readers

Two more letters from readers

A Third Letter by A. Vicar, 7th April 1888

A Third Letter by A. Vicar, 7th April 1888

Another Letter by A.H.Colles, 21st April 1888

Another Letter by A.H.Colles, 21st April 1888

Another Letter by A. Vicar, 24th April 1888

Another Letter by A. Vicar, 24th April 1888

A Letter from Joseph Butterworth, 25th April 1888

A Letter from Joseph Butterworth, 25th April 1888

Final Letter by A.H.Colles, 2nd May 1888

Final Letter by A.H.Colles, 2nd May 1888

An Article re Socialist Meeting, High Peak News, 19th May 1888

An Article re Socialist Meeting, High Peak News, 19th May 1888

An Article re Socialist Meeting, Ashton Reporter, 19th May 1888

An Article re Socialist Meeting, Glossopdale Chronicle, 19th May 1888

An Article re Socialist Meeting, Ashton Reporter, 19th May 1888 An Article re Socialist Meeting, Glossopdale Chronicle, 19th May 1888

Buxton Advertiser


23 Feb 1889


St. John's ambulance society.


The local branch of this society (Manchester centre), which was established on November 10th last, has made rapid progress. The members 25 in number have been instructed by Dr Allan at the Mechanics' Institute on successive Saturday nights, the course of instruction being limited to five lectures.


Last Saturday the members met at the Mechanics' Institute when Dr Allan presented the certificates in the order following: Messrs John Andrew, James Arnfield, John Henry Arnfield, John Ashton, John Ault, G. Bennett, Elijah G. Bridge, George Burdekin, John Bradley, John Collinson, Henry Drinkwater, Richard Goddard, Levi J. Hall, Elijah Hall, Thomas Hadfield, Peter Hill, Martin Hunt (Police-constable), Joseph Kirk, ditto., Oswald Kirk, Edward E. Stamper, John Ward, Geo. Wood, Albert Williamson, and Edward Taylor.


After the certificates had been presented, Mr Ault, on behalf of the newly-formed class, presented Dr Allan with a handsome aneroid barometer, by Armstrong. He said how much they were indebted to the doctor for his kindness in giving his services free of all cost, and remarked that the members of the class had most cheerfully subscribed towards the purchase of the barometer, which they hoped would be of use to him, and serve as a mark of their appreciation of his services. Dr Allan, in response, thanked the members for their good feeling, and expressed a hope that they would be of benefit to those who might meet with accidents.

Any praise they had to bestow, however, was really more due to Mr Levi Holt, of the Wharf Colliery, who had been instrumental in getting the class formed.


St Johns Ambulance Brigade

A vote of thanks was passed in the most cordial manner to Mr Hall for his services, and also to the trustees of the Mechanics' Institute, for kindly lending the building for the holding of classes free of cost.

A cordial vote of thanks was also accorded Mr Stamper for his valued services a secretary. Afterwards the members sat down to an excellent knife and fork tea, at Mr Wm Lees' (Railway Hotel.) Mr John Ault presided, and brief speeches were made, the remainder of the evening being agreeably whiled away with songs by Messrs George Bennett, John Ward, H. Stamper, and friends. Recitations were given by Messrs Thomas Hadfield and James Arnfield.

Dt Allan's dog Dr Hector Allan

Dr Hector Allan

His dog

An invoice/receipt

Dr Allan's house on Reservoir Road

His house on Reservoir Road

High Peak News


30 June 1906


The death occurred on Monday rather suddenly of Dr Hector Allan, who acted in the capacity of hon. surgeon-captain to the Volunteer Company. He had held that post for the greater part of the time that the company had been established.


He was also Medical Officer of Health to the Urban District Council, and public vaccinator for the district.


He was a man of jovial manner, and was well known in the locality.


He married Miss Heafield, of Taxal, but of later years Mrs. and Miss Heafield and her two sons resided at Chapel-en-le-Frith.


The deceased leaves a widow and one son.


The latter was during his earlier years educated at Buxton, and has been for the past few years studying for the medical profession.


Dr Allan was a Liberal in politics and a Scotchman by birth.


He will be very much missed in Whaley Bridge.




High Peak News

2 November 1907


Dr F.G. Allan has been appointed by the Macclesfield authority medical officer and public vaccinator for the Whaley Bridge district.